Visiting Liberty University

Visiting Liberty University

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

The Art of Bowing

So yes, it’s sort of a double joke. :) Since coming to Liberty, I've had the privilege of taking private cello lessons in addition to playing with the symphony orchestra. It’s been great to continue learning something I love so much while at college!

Anyway, I've been learning a lot in the past month – and I've been surprised to find so many biblical parallels in playing cello. I've had a lot of “God reminders” while practicing and I wanted to share them with you all. So, things I've learned...


      1. You've got to let go.

    There’s a difference between precision and a stiff attempt to control every detail. Precision comes from practice and focus; a tight, rigid grip will only end badly, both for playing and for your hand itself. Being a control freak makes you inflexible, un-pliable, and strangles the sound. Not to mention the trembling, cramping hand! This reminded me that I don’t have any ultimate control of my life – that’s in God’s hands. So why pretend and stress out over something that is beyond my control? 
“There is a way that seems right unto a man, but the Lord directs his steps.”


     2. You have to be willing to make mistakes.

     It comes with the territory – if you play an instrument, you will make mistakes. Period. But without making the mistakes and learning from them, you can’t become a better player. So when the string squeals or the note is so flat you could balance a glass of wine on it, you shrug, smile, and move on. In my Christian walk, I have to be willing to mess up and fail. I've often seen people’s true character more in their “I’m sorry” than in their “perfectness.” Jesus Christ is lifted up in our imperfections. When we are shown to be our weak selves, God is magnified and made strong.
“My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.”


      3. Sometimes you have to be broken down to nothing.

     Bad habits, skewed way of thinking, wrong understanding… All these things have to be torn down so they can be built up again right. Relearning is seldom a fun experience. It often comes with frustration and lots of repetitive work, sometimes without any noticeable results for a long time. But it is so worth it. In my case, every detail – which muscle moves what, how the fingers rest on the bow, the angle the cello is tilted – had to be relearned or readjusted. God does this in our lives too. Hard circumstances, big changes, and trials all bring us back to our knees and remind us where we draw our strength & our very breath. He makes us humble so that we are pliable in His hands. And then, He can build us back up.


      4. Live out loud.

     It was unconsciously forming – I was pulling up my elbow and shoulder and taking the weight out of the string to make my sound quieter. I had trained myself this way because, for some reason, I thought loud was wrong and undesirable. And then, even if I wanted to, I could not play “big.” But the shoulder and elbow has to relax, to move fluidly and quickly and boldly. The bow is meant to make the string sing out! Likewise, we’re meant to “live out loud,” as the Steven Curtis Chapman song coins it. We should pray for boldness to share Jesus with those he loves. We have a relationship with God – we, who even at our best were just filthy rags – and we were meant to sing it out!


      5. Enjoy the Ride!

     Throughout the years, there have been times I have avoided practicing. I would scrub the kitchen floors to keep from sitting down and working on scales and tricky runs. It was a thing on the list, to be done. But the more I understand, the more I delight in things I'm learning, the more I immerse myself in this beauty of music that God's given us, the more I love playing cello. In fact, there have been a couple days I have put off homework so I could practice (okay, so that's not saying much, but really I've had a great time!). This just kept bringing the verse in Matthew to mind:
"Come to me, you who are weary and heavy ladened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light."
This made me think: What if, just maybe, it's more about resting in Jesus, more about savoring my relationship with him? More about a crazy-awesome ride with Jesus at the wheel and me trusting him in joy. :) So, anyway! I've really enjoyed everything music-related here so far!


1 comment:

  1. Love this, Rachael! Thank you for sharing these wonderful comparisons and thoughts. :)
    (Plus I love hearing from you guys and finding out how you're doing.) :)

    ReplyDelete